The cost of not borrowing…

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Unused Line Fees or Commitment Fees

Everyone understands loans have an interest rate applied to the balance or the amount borrowed.  Not everyone understands business lines of credit generally come with ‘Commitment Fees’ or ‘Unused Line Fees’ applied on the amount of the line of credit not borrowed.  It is generally a relatively low rate compared to the interest rate, and it is basically the fee the bank charges to have the amount of the line of credit available for you to borrow if and when you need it, even though you are not currently using it.  Middle market CFO’s should understand the following 3 points:

(1) They may be negotiable.

(2) When comparing 2 or more loan offers, include the unused line fees in the analysis.  The difference may be substantial enough to tip the scales to one loan versus another.  If so, remember point #1.

(3) When determining the amount of the line of credit, include the unused line fees in the analysis.  While it may be best to have more credit available than you think you will need, understand the cost and factor it into your decision.

Although the reason the banks charge unused line fees is understandable and the cost is relatively small (especially compared to the amount of interest you might be paying on the portion of a term loan you don’t need), unused line fees are often a source of annoyance to many business owners and CFO’s who simply can not get used to the idea of paying the bank a fee on money they are not borrowing.  What types of fees and business expenses are the most annoying to you?

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