Hedging with Derivatives; Part 2 of 3: Interest Rate Risk

If variable interest rates leave your company exposed, you should consider an interest rate hedging strategy.  The most common method is a ‘vanilla’ interest rate swap which can be used to effectively convert all or part of a variable (LIBOR + X) rate loan into a fixed rate loan, thereby mitigating the risk of fluctuating exchange rates.  Simple example:  You have a $2 million loan that pays a variable interest rate.  You can enter into a swap agreement whereby you will borrow $1 million at a fixed rate and invest it in a security that earns a variable rate.  This will reduce your exposure to fluctuations in the variable LIBOR rate.

Another situation that may necessitate an interest rate hedging strategy is when you are anticipating a significant inflow or outflow of cash to take place in the future, perhaps one year from now.  The viability of the strategy may depend to some degree on the interest rate at that time, and you do not know what that interest rate will be.  By purchasing a Treasury futures contract, you could effectively ‘lock-in’ the interest rate now.  This will take one important variable out of the equation and make it easier to focus on the other aspects of the deal.

As with other types of hedging, remember the purpose of a hedge program is to mitigate risk.

Next up:  Hedging with Derivatives; Part 3 of 3:  Commodity or Product Input Risk

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